Odyssey Editions: E-Book Editions of Modern Classics

+1 by Katherine Bucknell

Shifting in perspective between Alice and Richard, Katherine Bucknell tells a beguiling, ultimately joyful, story. A writer of wisdom, elegance, and wit, Bucknell asks how we create, from day-to-day events, a life that has form, a life that feels whole. +1 is a sparkling, resonant exploration of what it means to love completely and of our limitless, even reckless, need to grow and to change.

The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow

The great novel of the American dream, of “the universal eligibility to be noble,” Saul Bellow’s third book charts the picaresque journey of one schemer, chancer, romantic, and holy fool: Augie March. Awarded the National Book Award in 1953, The Adventures of Augie March remains one of the classics of American literature.

Advertisements for Myself by Norman Mailer

Advertisements for Myself, a diverse and freewheeling tour through Mailer’s early career, covers the many subjects with which he’d grapple for the rest of his life: sex, race, politics, literature, and the systems of power that shape American life. A playful, unclassifiable snapshot of American culture at the end of the fifties, the book is also a cornerstone of Mailer’s long and prolific career: “In this volume,” declared The New York Times in 1959, “Mr. Mailer, at 36, shows once again that he is the most versatile if not the most significant talent of his generation.”

The Armies of the Night by Norman Mailer

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award and a cornerstone of New Journalism, The Armies of the Night is not only a fascinating foray into that mysterious terrain between novel and history, fiction and nonfiction, but also a key chapter in the autobiography of Norman Mailer—who, in this nonfiction novel, becomes his own great character, letting history in all its complexity speak through him.

The Blue Suit by Richard Rayner

Richard Rayner had a peripatetic childhood, and it seemed he found some sense of place when he attended Cambridge University. The study of philosophy combined with an obsession with books, however, served as the catalyst for a bizarre life of crime. Mounting debts propelled the author into a series of adventures, as he plundered bookstores for elusive first editions, forged checks, and acted as an accomplice in a Keystone Kops-like attempted bank robbery. The Blue Suit is the personal story, both tragic and comic, of an absence of identity and a long checkered past of crimes and misdemeanors.

Canarino by Katherine Bucknell

What price perfection?

David is an American investment banker living in London; Elizabeth, his wife, is a woman of peerless beauty and refinement. They have two children; their marriage seems perfect. Why does she want him to retire and move home to America? One summer evening, David, alone in their empty mansion, receives a phone call from a long-lost friend. So begins a tale about friendship, marriage, and betrayal that is filled with unexpected reversals.

Deception by Philip Roth

“With the lover everyday life recedes,” Roth writes—and exhibiting all his skill as a brilliant observer of human passion, he presents in Deception the tightly enclosed world of adulterous intimacy with a directness that has no equal in American fiction. This chilling and unconventional novel is about the infidelity of language itself, as told through the tender whispers, heated arguments and loaded words of two lovers attempting to escape from their spouses, their histories and themselves.

The Harold Letters by Clement Greenberg

In The Harold Letters, Janice Van Horne, Clement Greenberg’s widow, has gathered together Greenberg’s letters as a young man to his then friend and confidant, Harold Lazarus. Spanning fifteen years, this collection of letters intimately chronicles the development of Greenberg’s taste and ideas. The Harold Letters is frequently funny and always candid, revealing the young Greenberg’s passion, ambition, and intellectualism that would lead to his future status as the greatest art critic of the twentieth century.

Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie

When Haroun Khalifa’s father, the renowned storyteller Rashid Khalifa, loses his gift of gab, Haroun knows he has to help. Soon, he’s tumbled headfirst into an adventure story of his own, journeying toward the legendary Sea of Stories on the back of a flying Hoopoe bird. There, he finds a host of comical, unforgettable new friends, from Iff the Water Genie to Blabbermouth the page, and at the end of his quest, a formidable enemy—the Prince of Silence, Khattam-Shud himself. At once vastly humorous and deeply tender, Haroun and the Sea of Stories is a fantastical, witty contemporary fable and a powerful statement about the importance of storytelling. Salman Rushdie has created an instant classic—a dazzling read for children and adults alike that both celebrates and embodies the magic of fiction.

Henderson the Rain King by Saul Bellow

The most exuberant and funny of all Bellow’s novels, Henderson the Rain King remained the author’s personal favorite. Its outsized hero, Eugene Henderson, a mountain of a man, a millionaire, the father of many, remains adrift. Aggrieved, worn-out, all but defeated he longs to set things straight. Following the promptings of his unforgettable inner voice—“I want, I want, I want”—our hero finds himself in Africa.

Herzog by Saul Bellow

Moses E. Herzog, the protagonist of Saul Bellow’s Herzog, finds himself in a pickle. He may be handsome, witty and wise, but his wife has just taken off with his best friend, and he is without resources to face his troubles. What is an academic to do when his personal life turns to chaos?

Imaginary Homelands by Salman Rushdie

In Imaginary Homelands, Salman Rushdie presents ten years’ worth of concentrated thought on topics from the most cherished literary traditions and authors of India, Europe, and America to the politics of oppression, the joy of film and television, and the enduring value of the imagination. Writing with lively and intelligent insight—from the provocative, to the humorous, to the deeply profound—Rushdie demonstrates why he is celebrated as one of our greatest literary minds.

A Leg to Stand On by Oliver Sacks

Oliver Sacks is internationally renowned for his compassionate approach to patients affected by profound neurological disorders. Yet when an accident on an uninhabited mountain in Norway leaves Dr. Sacks with a severe leg injury, he becomes the patient. During what should have been a routine recovery period, he experiences an overwhelming sensation that his injured leg is now absent from his body, and indeed from his physical awareness. In A Leg To Stand On, one of Dr. Sacks’ most personal works, this disturbing experience is the starting point of a fascinating journey through the mysteries of perception, the physical substance of our identities, and the experience of being a patient.

Light House by William Monahan

A hilarious farce, in which a coastal New England hotel, the reader's expectations, and possibly The Novel itself, are turned inside out by an outrageous cast of characters, a mutinous Author, and the onset of a disastrous storm.

Los Angeles Without a Map by Richard Rayner

Barbara, a Playboy bunny, is delectable. Richard loves her. He abandons his life in London, a steady girlfriend, and a job, and flies to Los Angeles in search of Barbara and the romanticized America he's seen only in the movies.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat brings together twenty-four of Oliver Sacks’s most fascinating and beloved case studies. The patients in these pages are confronted with almost inconceivably strange neurological disorders; in Sacks’s telling, their stories are a profound testament to the adaptability of the human brain and the resilience of the human spirit.

Ocean Story by Leslie Marmon Silko

A new novella from the acclaimed author of Ceremony and Almanac of the Dead.

Operation Shylock by Philip Roth

What if a lookalike stranger stole your name, usurped your biography and went around the world pretending to be you? In this tour de force of fact and fiction, Philip Roth meets a man who may or may not be Philip Roth. Because someone with that name has been touring the State of Israel, promoting a bizarre exodus in reverse of the Jews. Roth decides to stop him—even if that means impersonating his impersonator. Suspenseful, hilarious, hugely impassioned, pulsing with intelligence and narrative energy, Operation Shylock is at once a spy story, a political thriller, a meditation on identity, and a confession.

Patrimony by Philip Roth

Patrimony, a true story, touches the emotions as strongly as anything Philip Roth has ever written. Roth watches as his eight-six-year-old father—famous for his vigor, his charm, and his repertoire of Newark recollections—battles with the brain tumor that will kill him. The son, full of love, anxiety, and dread, accompanies his father through each fearful stage of his final ordeal, and, as he does so, discloses the survivalist tenacity that has distinguished his father’s long, stubborn engagement with life.

The Politics of Abundance by Reed Hundt

The exploding pace of technological change today offers America opportunities to reduce our debt, grow our economy, and cement America as the most innovative and advanced nation on Earth. These solutions could be faster, better, cheaper and lasting—if the post-election government can agree on a growth strategy as well as a sensible budget policy. In The Politics of Abundance: How Technology Can Fix the Budget, Revive the American Dream, and Establish Obama’s Legacy, Reed Hundt and Blair Levin offer strategies that use private investment to rebuild America’s vital knowledge and power infrastructure in this country.

Queer by William S. Burroughs

Set in Mexico City during the early 1950s, Queer follows William Lee's hopeless pursuit of desire from bar to bar in the American expatriate scene. As Lee breaks down, the trademark Burroughsian voice emerges, a maniacal mix of self-lacerating humor and the Ugly American at his ugliest. Originally written in 1952 but not published until 1985, Queer is an enigma—both an unflinching autobiographical self-portrait and a coruscatingly political novel, Burroughs' only realist love story and a montage of comic-grotesque fantasies that paved the way for his masterpiece, Naked Lunch.

Seize the Day by Saul Bellow

Seize the day. Be in the present. Grasp the hour, the moment, the instant. This is the dubious advice given by outlandish Dr. Tamkin—part psychologist, part stockbroker—to poor Tommy Wilhelm. Unemployed, at the whim of his ex-wife and two children, and hurt by his proud and callous father, Wilhelm is disgusted with himself, yet forever hopeful that his suffering is purposeful. When he decides to entrust the last of his money to a mysterious commodities venture with Dr. Tamkin, he unwittingly sets in motion the most eventful day of his life. The journey that follows takes him across the length of New York City, from his hotel room at the Gloriana to the floor of the stock exchange, bringing him ever closer to "his heart's ultimate need."

The Victim by Saul Bellow

It's sweltering summer in New York City, and Asa Leventhal is alone. His co-workers ignore or condescend to him, his wife is away with her mother, and his estranged brother has run off, abandoning his wife and two sons. One night, Leventhal is confronted by a stranger—"one of those guys who want you to think they can see to the bottom of your soul"—who reveals himself to be a marginal figure from his distant past. Leventhal, accused of ruining the man's life, becomes shocked and dismissive, vehemently denying any part in the man's unhappy lot. But as time passes, he is increasingly unable to separate his own good fortune from the bad luck of this down-and-out stranger, who will not leave him be. A brief, haunting rumination on the vagaries of fate and responsibility, The Victim is, in the words of Norman Rush, Saul Bellow's "purest creation."

A World Restored by Henry Kissinger

The Napoleonic Wars were followed by an almost unprecedented century of political stability. A World Restored shows how Europe reestablished a peaceful order in the wake of Napoleon's disruption of the European balance of power. Part political biography, part diplomatic history, A World Restored analyzes the alliances formed and treaties signed by the world's leaders during the years 1812 to 1822, focusing on the two main negotiators: Viscount Castlereagh, the British foreign secretary, and Prince von Metternich, Austria's foreign minister. Henry Kissinger explains how the turbulent relationship between these two men, the differing concerns of their respective countries, and the changing nature of diplomacy influenced the final shape of the new international order.

Zero Hour by Reed Hundt

Modern life rests on two electromagnetic wave platforms: knowledge and power. The power platform is where the knowledge platform was in 1993. Emanating from the United States, digital mobile and Internet networks wrapped around the world, changing societies and economies in just a few years. The hundreds of millions of dollars invested in the American move to the new knowledge platform meant for the Clinton Administration that everything supposed to go up (labor force participation, income, productivity), went up. Everything supposed to go down (unemployment, cost of capital), went down. ...